Cheap Flights

A Collection of the 84 Best Tips for Traveling With Children

You never know how easy solo travel is until you have kids. As the amount of luggage you carry quadruples, the stress can too. But traveling with kids doesn’t have to be as overwhelming as you’re imagining right now, and travel can be extremely beneficial for your kids. In fact, there are families — with kids as young as infants and as old as grumpy teenagers — traveling around the world every day.

Surprisingly, family travel numbers are lower than expected, especially when considering all of the benefits of traveling with children. While many families choose not to travel with their kids because of the cost, others are shying away because they don’t feel confident or comfortable taking their children to new destinations. This collection of 82 tips from some of the most experienced traveling parents on the web will help you be prepared for all aspects of your journey, from packing your bags to making the most of your time when you arrive.

Travel Planning

Photo credit: Jon-Eric Melsæter

Photo credit: Jon-Eric Melsæter

1. Do your research

“Visit local parenting websites before your trip for information on parks, family-friendly restaurants, etc. These sites often also have coupons or discount codes you can take advantage of . Try Googling ‘your destination + parents.'”

Corinne McDermott, Founder of HaveBabyWillTravel.com

2. Prepare your kids for airport security

“Children 12 and under no longer have to remove their shoes when passing through the security checkpoint. But little kids still have to hand over their backpacks and stuffed animals for screening, which can cause worry. Explain beforehand that the TSA agents will take a picture of their belongings and then give everything back a few moments later.”

Suzanne Rowan Kelleher, About.com Family Vacations Expert 

3. Book a nonstop flight

“Fly nonstop if possible. Getting off the plane, dragging around all your baggage, and rushing to make a connection with kids in tow is not good for your mental health.”

Melanie Pinola, Lifehacker

4. Choose a kid-friendly destination

“Pick a kid-friendly location – stay in a safe and central area that’s close to local attractions, food outlets, the beach, the park, and all preferably within walking distance. This will save you time, money, and your kids from getting bored.”

Caz and Craig, Y Travel Blog

Photo credit: Phalinn Ooi

Photo credit: Phalinn Ooi

5. Scan your documents

“Scan your passports and travel documents and email them to yourself. You can now access them anywhere with internet access.”

Corinne McDermott, HaveBabyWillTravel.com

6. Be prepared for the weather

“It seems like common sense but children who are comfortable will be happier in a new environment. It’s hard to predict the weather, but being prepared will go a long way in your travels.”

Editor, Rough Guides

7. Minimize jetlag

“To minimize jetlag, try to arrive during daylight hours and get your kids on a local schedule as soon as you can. Limit daytime naps for babies on day one and try to push bedtime back as late as possible.”

Nicola, Jetlagandmayhem.com

Photo credit: Doe, John

Photo credit: Doe, John

8. Pack patterns

“Try dressing yourself and baby in patterned clothes. Patterns tend to not show spots and spills as much.”

Corinne McDermott, HaveBabyWillTravel.com

9. Book an early flight

“Don’t want to risk a bumped flight or delay? Book an early flight. A morning take-off means a quieter airport, and it will greatly lower the risk of getting stuck in a congested nightmare. As the day goes on, there can be a domino effect as one delayed flight bumps back into the next, which is why afternoon and evening flights are statistically more fraught with delays.”

Suzanne Rowan Kelleher, About.com Family Vacations Expert

Photo credit: Juhan Sonin

Photo credit: Juhan Sonin

10. Don’t travel with everyone else

“Avoiding holiday periods and traveling off-season can yield big savings on flights and accommodations. Even if your kids are in school, consider traveling just outside of major school holiday periods.”

Caz and Craig, Y Travel Blog

11. Use a Packing List

“This one is simple, consult a packing list so you don’t forget anything.”

Nicola, Jetlagandmayhem.com

Photo credit: John Revo Puno

Photo credit: John Revo Puno

12. Prepare your baby for change

“If you expect to be doing foreign travel during baby’s first year, get them used to other tastes and sleeping situations. If they only nap in their crib, they’re going to have a hard time settling in a portable cot or in their stroller. Mix up their food by alternating between homemade and jarred baby food. That way when you’re stuck in the middle of France, they won’t kick up a fuss when you serve them agneau et haricot vert out of a jar from the local Carrefour.”

Jody Robbins, Travels With Baggage

13. Make infant travel easier

“Dress your baby in clothes with built-in feet. You’re ensured warm toes and no worry of a lost baby shoe. Or two.”

Corinne McDermott, HaveBabyWillTravel.com

14. Stick to your budget

“Set a budget – Travel with kids does not have to be expensive. Decide on a comfortable budget that works for your family and include items such as souvenirs, entertainment, and a few unexpected activities. Once again, involve your kids to make sure they feel comfortable with your travel plans.”

Caz and Craig, Y Travel Blog

Photo credit: Kirt Edblom

Photo credit: Kirt Edblom

15. Keep things interesting

“I bring a new toy or snack for every 15 minutes of travel time on a plane, this keeps them occupied and there is never a dull moment.”

Brandy Black, The Next Family

16. Buy it there

“Pack the bare minimum, because you can always buy it there. Roll clothes and stuff socks and underwear inside shoes. Wear your heaviest clothes on the flight. Encourage kids to choose and pack their own clothes to minimize complaints and to teach travel skills.”

Caz and Craig, Y Travel Blog

17. Check which hotel baby items are available

“Check with your accommodation in advance what baby items they can provide such as a cot, sterilizer, baby bath. This will save you from packing things you don’t need. “

Nicola, Jetlag&Mayhem

Photo credit: UNICEF Ukraine

Photo credit: UNICEF Ukraine

18. Understand local customs before breastfeeding

“Breastfeeding in an unfamiliar destination can be a worry, and it is worth doing some research into local attitudes towards feeding in public before you go. If in doubt, try finding some female company, perhaps in a women’s clothing shop. Another idea is to head for the ladies’ toilets of a posh hotel; these are usually spacious, with seats and pleasant surroundings.”

19. Bring something new

“Bring a few books and toys they’ve never seen before – the novelty will capture their attention and probably keep them busy for longer than toys they have seen before.”

Bailey Gaddis, BaileyGaddis.com

Photo credit: urbanfoodie33

Photo credit: urbanfoodie33

20. Have snacks on hand

“Make sure to pack plenty of nutritious snacks. This is important for any age group. We never know exactly when the in-flight meal will be served, so having things like fruit, crackers, cookies will help until the actual meal is served.”

Helen Ochyra, Skyscanner

21. Book accommodations with separate sleeping areas

We look for accommodations that offer one or two bedroom suites, instead of the standard hotel room with one or two beds. You will pay a little more for this convenience, but a good night’s sleep is worth it. Lately we’ve turned to short-term apartment rentals, because they are typically cheaper than hotels and offer all of the comforts of home. We look for centrally located apartments that provide fully stocked kitchens and laundry

Cameron Wears, Traveling Canucks

Photo credit: Ryan Polei

Photo credit: Ryan Polei

22. Search for family deals

“If you’re going down the hotel route, always check for special family deals, from discounted rates to free meals for children; many international chains offer these. Most hotels and guesthouses provide breakfast, but unless it’s included in the room rate, it’s often a waste of money for children, particularly if they only eat a piece of bread or a bowl of cereal. If breakfast isn’t included, try asking for ‘complimentary’ ones for the children. Alternatively, you could take along something to snack on for the first day, and buy a simple breakfast to eat in your room thereafter.”

Fawzia Rasheed de Francisco, The Guardian

23. Invest in a child locator

“Most toddlers aren’t big fans of backpacks, leashes or anything that limits their freedom. Keep tabs on them at airports, train stations or other crowded attractions with a child locator, a small unit that attaches to a belt or shoes. If the child is lost, parents set the alarm off and follow the sound.”

Editor, Rough Guides

24. Stock up on diapers

“Bring along one diaper per hour of your travel day. You don’t want to risk running out!”

Corinne McDermott, HaveBabyWillTravel.com

Photo credit: Audrey

Photo credit: Audrey

25. Prepare your kids with projects

“Getting your children started on a few holiday-related projects before you leave is a great way to prepare them for what’s to come. You could explore maps, or the history, geography, animal and plant life of your destination, or read books or watch a film that’s set there. If the food is likely to be radically different, research dishes that they might enjoy, and try rustling up something similar before you go.”

Fawzia Rasheed de Francisco, The Guardian

26. Create a wind-down song

“Two weeks before you leave on your trip, choose a special song to sing to your child every night at bedtime that they associate with winding down. Then, when you’re traveling you have a go-to method for helping them (and yourself) relax.”

Bailey Gaddis, BaileyGaddis.com

Photo credit: Andrew Bardwell

Photo credit: Andrew Bardwell

27. Take a mini first-aid kit

“Packing a mini first-aid kit is a good idea, because with kids, you never know what can happen. The attractions or places you go might not have first-aid kits that are easy to access.”

Unknown source

28. Wipes are essential

“You can never have too many wipes. You can never have too many wipes.”

Corinne McDermott, HaveBabyWillTravel.com

Photo credit: Personal Creations

Photo credit: Personal Creations

29. Be prepared with activities

“If there’s a long trip ahead, keep some activities on hand that you can give to children one at a time to help pass the time. Things like colouring books, puzzles, play dough, travel board games (if they have someone to play with) are all good options.”

Editor, Rough Guides

30. Eliminate the stress of lost luggage

“Separate all of baby’s things throughout your luggage. If a bag gets lost, it’s not the one with all the baby clothing.”

Corinne McDermott, HaveBabyWillTravel.com

31. Pack layers for the plane

“Pack layers of clothing to ensure children stay warm or cool through the temperature fluctuations of travel. Airplanes can often be quite chilly, and depending on your destination, it can be quite hot. If a child is not comfortable, it’s more likely they’ll be fussy.”

Bailey Gaddis, BaileyGaddis.com

Photo credit: yo &

Photo credit: yo &

32. Book based on your baby

“Book flights for when you think your baby will be sleepy. If sleep isn’t likely, aim for the most cheerful time of day.”

Corinne McDermott, HaveBabyWillTravel.com

33. Consider other accommodation options

“Most big-city hotel rooms were not built for families with young kids. They usually have no refrigerator or microwave, floor space is at a premium, and neighbors can hear every tantrum. With an apartment, you get more space, thicker walls, a kitchen, a washing machine, and separate bedrooms. These extra facilities on a long stay can make your trip so much more enjoyable.”

Caz and Craig, Y Travel Blog

Photo credit: Jason Hall

Photo credit: Jason Hall

34. Be ready for delays

“Stash a ball in the trunk of your vehicle or in your carry-on bag. Nobody can predict flight or highway delays.”

Jody Robbins, Travels With Baggage

35. Read up on medications and vaccinations

“See if your destination requires any vaccinations or medications. Some may not be suitable for infants or toddlers.”

Corinne McDermott, HaveBabyWillTravel.com

36. Show them your itinerary

“Avoid the dreaded, ‘Are we there yet?’ whines by handing over the itinerary to them. Before you go, have elementary aged children (and older) plot out the route on GoogleMaps. Either print out the maps or have them follow along when you’re in the car.”

Jody Robbins, Travels With Baggage

37. Have supplies on hand

“Even if you plan on buying supplies when you arrive, have enough on hand so you’re not rushing out the minute you arrive.”

Corinne McDermott, HaveBabyWillTravel.com

38. Don’t wait

“Don’t wait!  Start traveling with your baby as soon as possible.  We took our daughter on her first interstate trip when she was 3 months old and her first international trip when she was 7 months old.  Now, at 3 1/2, she’s a phenomenal traveler, and gets so excited about going on our airplanes and being in new places.  While traveling with kids can be more difficult than traveling without kids, it’s so much fun to see the world through her eyes and experience the world with her.”

Akila McConnell, About.com Food Travel Expert

39. Get the necessary vaccines and get them early

“Some vaccines can require multiple visits and can take a few months to get the entire series of shots. Many adults haven’t had their booster shots, so get those as well. There’s nothing worse than getting a deep cut in place far from a hospital and then having to worry about whether your Tetanus booster is up to date.”

David Robert Hogg, My Little Nomads

40. Agree to have one parent activity and one kid activity per day

Research the areas you plan to visit in advance. Discuss with the kids all the things you want to do, and help them pick out places they want to see.   Plan one parent activity and one child activity each day.  If the kids know in advance that after visiting a museum they get to go to the cool park with the dragon, the museum is usually more enjoyable.

41. Always plan extra time on travel days, getting to and from excursions and when sightseeing

Always plan extra time on travel days, getting to and from excursions and when sightseeing. Kids seem to need to use the restroom at the last minute, are tired and can’t walk or you can’t find their favorite blankie.  Rushing is never fun, but it can be even more stressful with children in the mix.  Make travel easier on yourself and allow extra time in your vacation schedule.

Dana – The Talking Suitcase

On the Move

Photo credit: David D

Photo credit: David D

42. Take your time

“One of the best things you can do for your sanity, whether you are at the airport, sightseeing or having a bite to eat is to take your time. Children and toddlers love to explore and this is part of the travel experience. You will more likely keep your cool by factoring in time for questions, exploring, bathroom breaks.”

Editor, Rough Guides

43. Use the facilities

“Before disembarking, make sure they have been fed and to the toilet. Trust me, standing for an hour in customs with hungry and tired children is NO FUN!”

Caz and Craig, Y Travel Blog

Photo credit: Suzanne Shahar

Photo credit: Suzanne Shahar

44. Use a carrier when possible

“Lugging a stroller through the airport can be quite tiring and bulky. Consider using a baby carrier instead, which can make it much easier to move around, get through security and get on and off the plane.”

Unknown source

45. Stock your carry-on

“Keep baby’s food and toiletries together in your carry-on. It’s much easier to stay organized when going through security.”

Corinne McDermott, HaveBabyWillTravel.com

Photo credit: m01229

Photo credit: m01229

46. Put enough in your carry-on bags for the first day or two 

“This is good advice for anyone but especially when traveling with kids. If your bags are lost, you don’t want to be hunting for diapers or a pair of shorts immediately after your arrival in a new city or country.”

David Robert Hogg, My Little Nomads

47. Encourage your kids to keep a travel journal

“A travel journal for a child doesn’t have to be full of paragraphs. This can be drawings or things that they’ve done or foods they ate. A journal can be a great way for a child to remember the trip and look back on it when they return or at a later time.”

Editor, Rough Guides

Photo credit: Lennart Tange

Photo credit: Lennart Tange

48. Know your number of bags

“Count your bags and carry-ons and remember the number. Don’t ask me why I’m suggesting this.”

Corinne McDermott, HaveBabyWillTravel.com

49. Pack less

“When traveling with the kids, always take less than what you want. Kids falling asleep on planes is common and lugging a sleeping child plus bags can be a nightmare. Carry less, so your arms are free to carry your child. You will not wear a new outfit everyday and you will buy stuff, so leave half the suitcase spare.”

Erin Bender, TravelWithBender

Photo credit: Phalinn Ooi

Photo credit: Phalinn Ooi

50. Put one parent in charge

“Don’t share the burden of any one duty while traveling. Packing for example. One person packs and knows where everything is. Two people pack and no one really knows where anything is. Same with hotels. One person plans them, arranges them, and books them. Do you have that confirmation email or do I? Na-Uh!”

David Robert Hogg, My Little Nomads

51. Have one parent pre-board

“To pre-board or not? If your airline still offers this try having one of you pre-board and get organized while your partner tires out the kids until the last minute.”

Corinne McDermott, HaveBabyWillTravel.com

 52. Don’t be shy when asking for help

“If you’d like to be met at check-in and helped with the children and the bags all the way to your plane, ask for ‘meet and assist’ services when booking your flight. This is generally provided by the airport and not the airline, and whether or not you get it depends on the availability of staff, but if you’re traveling as a single parent with more than one child, you’ll be given priority”

Fawzia Rasheed de Francisco, The Guardian

In Flight

Photo credit: Greg

Photo credit: Greg

53. Save feeding time for take-off and landing

“Are you flying with an infant? It’s a good idea to give them their milk at take-off and landing. The milk can help to equalize pressure in their ears. Be sure to find out what’s allowed on flight in terms of pre-made milk.”

Helen Ochyra, Skyscanner

54. Be patient (even when it’s difficult)

“The most important thing to pack when traveling with babies and little kids is your patience.”

Corinne McDermott, HaveBabyWillTravel.com

55. Alternate your child’s playlists

“Unless you want to listen to The Wiggles or Biebs for eight-hours straight, rotate playlists. Let everyone get a set amount of time.”

Jody Robbins, Travels With Baggage

56. Sit in back when possible

“Try to sit at the back of the plane. As Sara Esther Crispe writes on The Jewish Woman, you’ll be closer to the bathrooms, less likely to bother the other passengers, and possibly have more help from flight attendants. You’re going to have to wait for the stroller when you get off the plane anyway.”

Melanie Pinola, Lifehacker

Photo credit: Bridget Coila

Photo credit: Bridget Coila

57. Wow them with surprises

“Make a surprise bag with dollar store treats (magazines, pipe cleaners, sticker books) and dole them out one by one on the half hour.”

Jody Robbins, Travels With Baggage

58. Talk about safety on the way

“Talking about safety is always good idea when entering a new destination, especially if there are crowds. Talk to your children about what to do if they do get lost. Be sure they know how to tell the difference between staff members and those that aren’t.”

Unknown source

59. Ditch the shoes

“On airplanes, remove toddler’s shoes as soon as they sit down. That way if they kick the seat in front of them (and they will!) it won’t be as annoying.”

Jody Robbins, Travels With Baggage

At Your Destination

Photo credit: Roderick Eime

Photo credit: Roderick Eime

60. Start your day with positivity

“Spend five minutes every morning in a calm location visualizing how you would like your trip to unfold and feeling the positive emotions attached to these positive outcomes. This will send you into your trip exuding a sense of calm that will be absorbed by your children.”

Bailey Gaddis, BaileyGaddis.com

61. Consider renting equipment

“Renting equipment at your destination may be easier, but check your airline baggage fees to see if it’s cost effective.”

Corinne McDermott, HaveBabyWillTravel.com

Photo credit: Antoine K

Photo credit: Antoine K

62. Don’t be afraid to ask

“Check for family deals – always ask about discounted rates, free meals for children, and an upgrade at check in – they can only say no.”

Caz and Craig, Y Travel Blog

63. Create pool rules

“When staying in a hotel with a swimming pool, remind your young kids that they don’t go in the pool without telling mom or dad. Make it the first thing you do after you put down your bags in the room.”

Unknown source

Photo credit: Lotzman Katzman

Photo credit: Lotzman Katzman

64. Use a small digital camera

“The fantastic shots you think you’ll get of the Grand Canyon, or Taj Mahal or Great Wall of China will be left and forgotten. The really great photos that you’ll love and savor for years to come will be the up-close and intimate shots of your kids and your family. And the key to getting great family photos is to take a lot of them. A ton of them! And the way you do that is to take a small camera. Have it with you all the time and take pictures as quickly and discreetly as possible. You might insist, ‘I’ll do all that, but with a bigger better camera,’ but you probably won’t.”

David Robert Hogg, My Little Nomads

65. Get creative with special projects

“To hold your child’s interest during sightseeing portions of your trip, give them a special project, like a scavenger hunt or taking pictures for a photo journal.”

Bailey Gaddis, BaileyGaddis.com

Photo credit: Jim Pennucci

Photo credit: Jim Pennucci

66. Use public transportation

“By sticking to public transportation, you’re free from the bringing-the-car-seat dilemma plus you’re being good to the environment!”

Corinne McDermott, HaveBabyWillTravel.com

67. Don’t panic

“Don’t panic if certain aspects of your travel experience are difficult – your child is learning valuable lessons about how to handle adversity in unknown locations and situations.”

Bailey Gaddis, BaileyGaddis.com

Photo credit: Guian Bolisay

Photo credit: Guian Bolisay

68. Don’t do too much BUT don’t do too little either

“I think the biggest mistake parents traveling with kids make is doing too little not too much. Get out there. Enjoy. Experience. Wear the kids out and get them tired.”

David Robert Hogg, My Little Nomads

69. Use your stroller in multiple ways

“A stroller is not just a stroller. It’s also a high chair, a bed, and in a pinch, a luggage cart. Also, a baby jail.”

Corinne McDermott, HaveBabyWillTravel.com

70. Use online storage for photos

“Besides losing the kids, my photos are what I’m most concerned with losing. Forget your bag on the train platform and there goes your camera — and your photos. You can get free online storage at Adrive (50GB) or SkyDrive (25GB). You will need a laptop, of course, to upload your photos. Upload your pictures every night or two, and then when you take your camera out on that fishing trip, you’re not worried about dropping your camera and losing the last 2 weeks of photos.”

David Robert Hogg, My Little Nomads

71. Create a meeting place

“In each new place, don’t forget to designate a meeting point in case anyone gets separated from the group. If it’s likely you’ll be in really dense crowds, promising a reward for staying together works as a good incentive.”

Fawzia Rasheed de Francisco, The Guardian

Photo credit: Dani Vazquez

Photo credit: Dani Vazquez

72. Play like a local

“Local toys are often worth seeking out and make great gifts to take home. Apart from the novelty value, kids tend to like playing with the same things that local children have, and it can help with making friends.”

FX Trader Tips

73. Find the free days

“Attend museums and tourist sites on FREE DAYS or when they are discounted. Most museums have special discount times or free nights. Before you go anywhere, make sure you look on their website or Facebook page to find out if they offer free visiting hours or family discounts.”

Caz and Craig, Y Travel Blog

Photo credit: Dave Hogg

Photo credit: Dave Hogg

74. Use wristbands for identification

“Use wristbands with your information and/or cellphone number on them when visiting crowded places. Mabel’s Labels 411 Wristbands are good ones.”

Corinne McDermott, HaveBabyWillTravel.com

75. Let everyone choose

“Remember, traveling with children means you have to cater to their interests, too. Try to let everyone have a day doing exactly what they want. If it’s your teen’s day, let them pick the activities, the pool time, the restaurant choices. Parents should do this as well. Swap off with your partner, so each parent gets a full day off. When you reconnect at dinner, you’ll realize how worth it this was.”

Unknown source

Photo credit: faungg's photos

Photo credit: faungg’s photos

76. Be prepared for separation

“Even if you have the most well-behaved kids in the world, things happen: Kids wander off, or they get separated from you in a crowd. Whenever you’re traveling with children in an unfamiliar place, it’s good to have a go-to procedure in place in case something happens. Be sure to give each child a business card from your hotel so they have local contact information.”

Rick Steves’ Europe, Rick Steves

77. Don’t let your attitude slip

“Stay Positive  – Attitude is everything: no matter how much you plan and prepare, things can and will go wrong. Just go with the flow and everything will work out great. Travel is not always easy and traveling with kids can be tough. Just treat your trip like one big adventure and any mishaps simply become small obstacles for you to overcome. Plan for occurrences such as air travel delays, illness, and homesickness. If unforeseen events happen, stay positive. Your children will learn important life lessons from watching you on this trip.”

Caz and Craig, Y Travel Blog

Photo credit: Matt Deavenport

Photo credit: Matt Deavenport

78. Get a driver

“If you’re traveling in an inexpensive or developing country, consider getting a driver instead of driving yourself. Prices are usually reasonable and they’ll know the ways and customs of the road better than you will. Tip: have the address of your destination for longer distance trips. When you start your trip the driver will inevitably say, “Oh yes, I know where that is”, which translates to “I’ll ask for directions when we get there”. An address, instead of just a name, will help speed the process.”

David Robert Hogg, My Little Nomads

79. Don’t over-schedule your days

“Don’t over-schedule your days. A looser itinerary means no one will be disappointed.”

Corinne McDermott, HaveBabyWillTravel.com

80. Create tangible memories

“Apart from taking photographs, there are lots of ways to help your children preserve memories of your trip. You could buy a postcard for each destination and help them note a single memory on the back, alongside the date or their age. You could also get them started on collections of things that can be found in most places, such as badges, paperweights, model cars and boats or toy animals.”

Fawzia Rasheed de Francisco, The Guardian

Photo credit: N i c o l a

Photo credit: N i c o l a

81. Watch what you eat

“When eating out in countries with poor standards of sanitation and hygiene, always eat at busy places where the turnover of food will be fast, and avoid buffets — they’re notorious for harboring the bugs and bacteria that cause diarrhea.”

Unknown source

82. Use the lobby brochures

“Coupons and discounts – check out the brochure shelf in the lobby and any tourist literature in your room for ways to shave a few bucks off the price of your family vacation.”

Caz and Craig, Y Travel Blog

83. Always have a plan for the day

“It doesn’t need to be cast in stone – stay flexible and easy going — but you should walk out the hotel door in the morning with a plan of where you’re going, what subway or bus you’re taking, what attractions do you have planned for the day? Perhaps obvious and natural to some but for me, it wasn’t and once I took the time to plan the day on the night before, everything became a lot easier.”

David Robert Hogg, My Little Nomads

84. Communication is key

“If you are traveling with another family (or adults) discuss what each person wants to do, and agree how to split time up with children. If each couple will have time alone, take turns minding the children, and talk about the balance of spending time together and apart. Come to an agreement about the way you’ll split the bills (taking into account the smaller share of expenditures for the children).”

Fawzia Rasheed de Francisco, The Guardian

The Bottom Line

Photo credit: kristin klein

Photo credit: kristin klein

Stop worrying and start traveling with your kids. There’s no better way to encourage your family to unplug their devices and connect with one another than to embark on the adventure of a lifetime. What are you waiting for? Start planning, pack your bags and discover the sights, sounds, unique cultures and natural wonders of the world with your kids.

3 Comments

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